Awareness • Prevention • Community
Email: info@pccsa.org | Tel: 252-328-2827

The Pitt County Coalition on Substance Abuse is a 501(c)3 non-profit dedicated to bringing about a community where youth reject substance use, adults utilize low-risk choices regarding substance use, and treatment services are available to those in need.

Latest News

  • 10 May, 2016
    GREENVILLE, N.C. (WNCT) – People who abuse prescription drugs are 40 times more likely to start using heroin, a drug on the rise. Locking up prescription medicine can save families a lot of heartaches. “Lock Med” boxes are good for anything you want to keep safe. One woman from Greenville called the Pitt County Sheriff’s Office after some of her medication disappeared. A deputy brought her one of the containers and now she wants everyone to consider getting what she calls “the box.” “I’m telling every senior citizen, medicine taker; please get the box,” said Sadie Washington, Lock Med owner. Washington is talking about Lock Med; a container to hold, store and lock away prescription medications.”I’m very happy, I feel safe,” said Washington. The box opens on each side and can contain as much medication as needed. 9 On Your Side tested the box, and it cannot be opened after it is locked up. “We want to get these drugs off the streets we don’t want people stealing them, taking them, away from their houses and either selling them to get other drugs or using them themselves,” said Samantha Soares, of the Pitt County Coalition on Substance Abuse. Soares works with the Pitt County Coalition of Substance Abuse, the organization which provided the Sheriff’s office with Washington’s lock box. She said the container won’t solve all drug addiction problems, but it’s a start. “We’re limiting access because you can’t you can’t just walk into the bathroom open up, your family member or friends medicine cabinet and takes some pills. It’s in a lock box,” said Soares. Soares paid Washington a visit Monday afternoon. She showed her how to use the box, something she’s so glad to have. “I think it’s a wonderful thing, and it saves a lot of headaches saves a lot of problems with the law enforcement,” said Washington. Soares advises people to keep their boxes hidden in a closet or under the bed. If you know someone who needs a lock box The Pitt County Coalition on Substance Abuse has some available for free.   As of May 10th, 2016 PCCSA has been able to provide 10 lockboxes to some residents in Pitt County.   If you would like to get a lockbox visit www.lockmed.com and order yours today.
  • PCCSA Launches #StopThePoppin Campaign Pitt County Coalition on Substance Abuse Launches a Campaign to Address Prescription Pain Medicine Abuse and Heroin Abuse and Related Overdoses   GREENVILLE – 100. That’s how many people die EVERY DAY in the US from drug overdose…almost one in ten Americans have a substance abuse disorder. To combat this, the Pitt County Coalition on Substance Abuse is launching a new county-wide campaign targeting prescription and heroin abuse. The new campaign, called #StopthePoppin, is a multi-media campaign designed to raise awareness of the issue, to give community members the right tools for talking about the epidemic, and to combat it.   “46 Americans die every day from prescription drug overdoses. That’s almost two deaths an hour, or 17,000 annually,” stated Elizabeth Montgomery Lee, quoting a statistic from the American Society of Addition Medicine. “Another 8,200 Americans die from heroin overdoses. Drug overdose was the leading cause of death in 2013, beating out homicide and car accidents. We have to change that.”   Heroin and prescription drug abuse continues to rise, and so do overdoses associated with them. Most people assume drug dealer’s tactics and access to drugs are pushing these trends up. While that is true, in 2013, the CDC reported that nearly 68% of people who begin using prescription drugs non-medically for the first time obtained those drugs from a family member or friend.   “We have to stop this trend. It’s truly an epidemic,” stated Timothy Livengood, Vice President of PCCSA. “We’re seeing stats that almost 75% of patients addicted to pain prescriptions are converting to heroin, because it’s cheaper. We have to make sure this community has the prevention, harm reduction, and recovery solutions it needs to help those in crisis. This campaign does just that.”   Community tools such as educational materials and toolkits and educational events will be rolled out as part of the #StopthePoppin campaign. Additionally, media campaigns, including a billboard and social media have already been launched. The coalition is also researching school based and religious based programs they can join with to increase the audience.   To help combat this epidemic, BioDelivery Sciences has provided PCCSA a grant to help launch this campaign. “BDSI is pleased to support the important efforts of PCCSA in combating the serious problem of substance abuse. We recognize the impact of substance abuse on individuals, family and friends, and the community overall,” stated Al Medwar, Vice President. Medwar went on to say that BDSI sees the need for additional resources in the community and that the company wants to make a difference in the lives of those suffering from addiction. “BDSI has focused its efforts on the development of treatments for opioid addiction as well as for alternative therapies for the management of pain. As a North Carolina based company, we are glad to support the efforts that PCCSA is providing the community both locally and beyond.” BDSI's marketed products and those in development address serious and debilitating conditions such as breakthrough cancer pain, chronic pain, painful diabetic neuropathy and opioid dependence.”   For more information on the #StopthePoppin campaign, visit www.PCCSA.org .   About BioDelivery Sciences International BioDelivery Sciences International, Inc. is a specialty pharmaceutical company with a focus in the areas of pain management and addiction medicine.  BDSI is utilizing its novel and proprietary BioErodible MucoAdhesive (BEMA®) technology and other drug delivery technologies to develop and commercialize, either on its own or in partnership with third parties, new applications of proven therapies aimed at addressing important unmet medical needs.   BioDelivery Sciences developed and markets BUNAVAIL (buprenorphine and naloxone) buccal film (CIII) for the maintenance treatment of opioid dependence. BDSI's headquarters is located in Raleigh, North Carolina.   About PCCSA The Pitt County Coalition on Substance Abuse is a 501(c)3 non-profit dedicated to bringing about a community where youth reject substance use, adults utilize low-risk choices regarding substance use, and treatment services are available to those in need. For more information about PCCSA, please visit: www.pccsa.org.
  • PCCSA Hosts 6th Annual Fall Festival Pitt County Coalition on Substance Abuse to host public event on September 19th   GREENVILLE – According to University of Michigan's 2014 Monitoring the Future study, one in five high school seniors reported binge drinking at least once in the prior two weeks. In 2013, one in twelve youth aged 12 to 17 were current illicit drug users and 11.6% of those youth were current alcohol users.   We have to change these statistics. Pitt County youth are depending on us.   That's why PCCSA is hosting their 2015 Fall Festival. PCCSA is driven to bring about a community in which youth reject substance use, adults utilize low risk choices regarding substance use, and treatment services are available to all those in need. We meet these goals by making the community aware of the current and ongoing concerns surrounding drug problems, promoting policies and practices that effectively address substance use, and equipping parents, youth and adults with the skills necessary to reject substance use/abuse and seek treatment if needed. This year, we are focusing on getting Pitt County Youth involved in helping prevent substance abuse and misuse by having them create the #stopthepoppin media campaign and using their own voices and messages to tell the story of recovery.   On September 19, 2015 we will host our 6th Annual Fall Festival and Walk for Recovery. This year's theme, "Visible, Vocal, Valuable!" emphasizes that while the road to recovery may be difficult, the benefits of preventing and overcoming mental health and/or substance use disorders can be achieved when individuals, families, and communities work together. “We have to show our community that prevention works, that treatment is effective, and that people recover,” stated Elizabeth Montgomery-Lee, Executive Director of PCCSA. People in recovery achieve healthy lifestyles, both physically and emotionally, and contribute in positive ways to their communities. They also prove to family members, friends, and others that prevention works, treatment is effective, and people recover.   This year’s event will include a one mile walk through the town of Greenville, NC – starting at the Town Commons. In addition, we will promote a poster contest for youth and adults, have fun activities for families and children, publicize the benefits of prevention and treatment, and recognize individuals and groups who have worked to care for people affected by addiction.   We invite you to join PCCSA on Saturday, September 19th from 9-noon at the Town Commons in Greenville, NC to learn more about the organization and how to make change on the underage drinking and prescription abuse issues in Pitt County. For directions and additional information please call PCCSA at 252.328.2827.   The Pitt County Coalition on Substance Abuse is a 501(c)3 non-profit dedicated to bringing about a community where youth reject substance use, adults utilize low-risk choices regarding substance use, and treatment services are available to those in need. For more information about PCCSA, please visit: www.pccsa.org.
  • PCCSA offers Underage Drinking Prevention Education Pitt County Coalition on Substance Abuse to host public event on July 28, 2015 featuring the Talk it Out Campaign of the NC ABC Commission   GREENVILLE – 13.9. That’s the average age children in NC take their first drink. To combat this, the North Carolina Alcoholic Beverage Control Commission (ABC) is partnering with the Pitt Coalition on Substance Abuse (PCCSA) to bring a new statewide campaign targeting underage drinking to Pitt County. The new campaign, called Talk It Out, is a multi-media campaign designed to raise awareness of the issue, and to give parents the right tools for talking to kids about the dangers of underage drinking.   “Local community involvement is absolutely critical to the success of the campaign,” Kat Haney, NC ABC Commission Coalitions Director, said. “It’s a big state, and we can’t do it alone.” During PCCSA’s coalition meeting, Haney will speak about the Talk It Out campaign and how to bring awareness to the issue locally.   NC ABC unveiled the campaign along with the Commission’s research, The State of Underage Drinking in North Carolina, in December 2014. The research uncovered that children think underage drinking is a much bigger problem than their parents and the average age children in North Carolina take their first drink is earlier than most adults tend to think.   In addition to the Commission’s research, several campaign resources are available including tools to combat the problem, TV advertisements to help raise awareness of the issue, and a video featuring North Carolina families who have experienced, first-hand, the traumatic consequences of underage drinking.   For more information on the Talk It Out campaign, visit TalkItOutNC.org.   We invite you to join PCCSA on Tuesday, July 28th at the Seahorse Restaurant at 6pm to learn more about the campaign and how to make change on this important issue in Pitt County. For directions and additional information please call PCCSA at 252.328.0027.   The Pitt County Coalition on Substance Abuse is a 501(c)3 non-profit dedicated to bringing about a community where youth reject substance use, adults utilize low-risk choices regarding substance use, and treatment services are available to those in need. For more information about PCCSA, please visit: www.pccsa.org.
  • FETAL ALCOHOL TRAINING OFFERED IN GREENVILLE NC GREENVILLE—Six billion dollars…annually. That is what Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders cost the United States every year. Alcohol use during pregnancy is the leading known preventable cause of intellectual disabilities and birth defects in the United States. Between 10 and 15 births per thousand are identified with an FASD diagnosis. The average cost of treatment for someone born with FASD can cost over two million dollars in a lifetime. Even with these staggering statistics, 7.5% of percent of pregnant women in North Carolina drank alcohol during the last three months of their pregnancy, and 13.1% did not change their alcohol consumption from before pregnancy. To combat this preventable disorder, the Pitt County Coalition on Substance Abuse is offering free trainings on Monday, April 20th and Tuesday, April 21st at the Holiday Inn Express in Greenville. Events start at 8:30 each day. Monday’s training will feature Dr. Yasmin Senturias, a renowned speaker on FASD Diagnoses, prevention, and treatment. Dr. Senturias will be speaking on the research and treatment of FASD, as well as the identification of the lifelong illness. Monday’s training will conclude with a parent panel, where parents of children who suffer from FASD will speak about their experience. Monday’s target audience is counselors, therapists, social workers, nurses, and providers. Tuesday’s training will be presented by Amy Hendricks. Amy will present “FASD 101: An Ounce of Prevention.” She will also be presenting “Train the Trainer.” The target audience of Tuesday’s training is prevention specialists, health educators, student leaders, substance abuse professionals, coalition leaders, and community leaders. During both days, participants will learn how alcohol exposed pregnancies can affect the developing brain, how FASD may present in individuals, the importance of early recognition and intervention, and the need for preventing alcohol exposed pregnancies. In addition, day two attendees will be trained to deliver the FASD prevention to specific target populations. “FASD is a preventable diagnosis,” states Elizabeth Montgomery Lee, Executive Director of the Pitt County Coalition on Substance Abuse. “The symptoms can range from abnormal facial features, growth problems, central nervous system damage, learning problems, memory problems, shortened attention spans, communication problems, and vision and hearing disabilities. All these symptoms are preventable, just by education pregnant women not to consume alcohol or other substances during pregnancy. Timothy Livengood, a board member with PCCSA, stated “Prevention is our passion at PCCSA and we feel it important to get the word out about this preventable diagnosis. Educating women, and the community, will allow us to combat this avoidable cause of disability.” For more information relating to FASD or the trainings offered, please contact Elizabeth Montgomery Lee at 252.328.2827.
  • 17 December, 2012

    Pitt County Coalition on Substance Abuse presents award to Vidant Medical Center

    Vidant Medical Center recently was recognized by the Pitt County Coalition on Substance Abuse. From left are Barry Dixon, CEO of Dixon Social Interactive Services and the president of the Pitt County Coalition on Substance Abuse; Linda Hofler, senior vice president of patient care, Vidant Medical Center; Dr. David Ames, PORT Human Services and coalition board member. (more…)